preloader

IC^2S^2

June 8-11, 2015
Finlandia Hall, Helsinki, Finland
Conference Chairs
Karen Cook (Stanford)

Karen S. Cook is the Ray Lyman Wilbur Professor of Sociology; Director of the Institute for Research in the Social Sciences (IRiSS); and Vice-Provost for Faculty Development and Diversity at Stanford. She conducts research on social interaction, social networks, social exchange, and trust. She has edited a number of books in the Russell Sage Foundation Trust Series, including Trust in Society (2001), Trust and Distrust in Organizations: Emerging Perspectives (with R. Kramer, 2004), eTrust: Forming Relations in the Online World (with C. Snijders, V. Buskens, and Coye Cheshire, 2009), and Whom Can Your Trust? (with M. Levi and R. Hardin, 2009). She is co-author of Cooperation without Trust? (with R. Hardin and M. Levi, 2005) and she co-edited Sociological Perspectives on Social Psychology (with Gary Alan Fine and James S. House, 1995). In 1996, she was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and in 2007 to the National Academy of Sciences. In 2004 she received the ASA Social Psychology Section Cooley Mead Award for Career Contributions to Social Psychology.

Santo Fortunato (Aalto)

Santo Fortunato is Professor of Complex Systems at the Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science of Aalto University, Finland. Previously he was director of the Sociophysics Laboratory at the Institute for Scientific Interchange in Turin, Italy. Prof. Fortunato got his PhD in Theoretical Particle Physics at the University of Bielefeld In Germany. He then moved to the field of complex systems. His current focus areas are network science, especially community detection in graphs, computational social science and science of science. His research has been published in leading journals, including Nature, PNAS, Physical Review Letters, Reviews of Modern Physics, Physics Reports and has collected over 10,000 citations (Google Scholar). His review article Community detection in graphs (Physics Reports 486, 75-174, 2010) is the most cited paper on networks of the last years. He is the recipient of the Young Scientist Award for Socio- and Econophysics 2011, a prize given by the German Physical Society.

Michael Macy (Cornell)

Michael Macy left the farm in Tennessee where he grew up to attend Harvard, where he received his B.A. and later Ph.D, along with an M.A. from Stanford. He is currently Goldwin Smith Professor of Arts and Sciences and Director of the Social Dynamics Laboratory at Cornell, where he has worked since 1997. With support from the National Science Foundation, the Department of Defense, and Google, his research team has used computational models, online laboratory experiments, and digital traces of device-mediated interaction to explore familiar but enigmatic social patterns, such as circadian rhythms, the emergence and collapse of fads, the spread of self-destructive behaviors, cooperation in social dilemmas, the critical mass in collective action, the spread of high-threshold contagions on small-world networks, the polarization of opinion, segregation of neighborhoods, and assimilation of minority cultures. Recent research uses 509 million Twitter messages to track diurnal and seasonal mood changes in 54 countries, and telephone logs for 12B calls in the UK to measure the economic correlates of network structure. His research has been published in leading journals, including Science, PNAS, American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, and Annual Review of Sociology.

Signup for Conference News

No Spam - only latest news and activity updates!